Thursday, October 9, 2008

Pullman Bread


My Pullman bread pans have finally arrived! I have searched far and wide for these pans, which are basically lidded loaf pans that make a sandwich-type loaf. I found some at Orson Gygi's but they were the wrong size (the 16-or 18-inch length). When the guy at Gygi's said that he didn't know when the next order would be in because of something about the price of steel in China, I panicked a bit. I searched Amazon.com and found "only two left in stock. Order now!" So that's exactly what I did.

Ever since I gave Grandma Sycamore the boot I've been sticking to my guns and trying to keep on a supply of homemade bread. I'm excited about these pans because this type of bread is great for sandwiches, toast, i.e., what my family usually eats every day. This bread is easy to make, just chuck it in the bowl and knead. There's no milk to scald and since you're working with a pretty firm dough, it's easy even to knead by hand and not worry about adding too much flour. The result is a bread with a tight crumb that's easy to slice. This recipe is from Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook.

Pullman Bread
Note: this makes one loaf but it's easily doubled
1 1/2 lbs (about 4 1/2 c.) bread flour (note: I didn't have to add all the flour, so hold back a little to until you see how it comes together)
3 1/2 t. instant yeast
1 1/2 t. kosher salt
1 1/2 T. sugar
1/3 c. dry milk
2 T. unsalted butter, room temp
1 3/4 c. warm water
vegetable oil, for bowl and pan

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine teh flour, yeast, salt, sugar, dry milk, and butter. Add the warm water and beat on low speed until the dough is smooth, elastic, and uniform in color, about 5 minutes.
Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and finish kneading it by hand, about five times, making sure that all ingredients are fully incorporated and the dough forms a smooth ball. Place teh dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a woarm place until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.

Gently deflate dough and pull the sides into the center. Invert the dough in the bowl, so that it rests smooth side up. Cover with plastic wrap, and let rise again until doubled in bulk.

Generously brush a 12-inch Pullman loaf pan with vegetable oil, making sure to coat the underside of the lid, as well as the bottom and sides of the pan. Set aise. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured surface. Roll out the dough to a 12-by8-inch rectangle, with a long side facing you. Starting at the top, roll the dough toward you, gently pressing as you go to form a tight log. Pat in the ends to make even. gently roll the log back and forth to seal the final seam. Place the loaf, seam side down, in te prepared pan, and slide the lid three-quarters of the way closed. Let rise until dough is almost touching the lid. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425.

Close the lid completely and bake, rotating pan halfway through, until light and golden brown, about 45 minutes. Reduce oven temp to 350 and continue baking another 30 minutes. (Note: I only baked another 15 minutes.)

Transfer pan to wire rack to cool for 10 minutes. Turn out bread and cool completely before slicing. The bread can be wrapped and stored for up to 4 days.

5 comments:

Carrie said...

those pans are awesome! What happens if you fill a pan with too much dough and it tries to ooze out from under the lid while baking?
I'm only asking because I KNOW that would happen to me since I'm such an amateur!

Jessica said...

I get the King Arthur Flour catalog, and have always wondered why one would use those bread pans with the lids! Good to know! Oh Cathy...Can I come over and you show me how to make bread? Mine ALWAYS comes out like a brick.

Mom to Many said...

I have long been interested in those lovely covered bread pans.
Have you seen the article about sliced bread on Wikipedia? Scroll down to the sliced bread ban. It made me smile.

Jessica Harris said...

The crust was very hard and the inside was soft and fluffy. I am trying to figure out what I did wrong, I followed everything to a T. The crust needed to be softer to be enjoyable to eat. I had to cut it off.

Jessica Harris said...

The crust was very hard and the inside was soft and fluffy. I am trying to figure out what I did wrong, I followed everything to a T. The crust needed to be softer to be enjoyable to eat. I had to cut it off.